Boarding is Process

From Richardson’s book on Emerson teaching writing;”First We Read, Then We Write.” It says art but say boarding instead.

“Art is the path of the creator to his work. “One cannot repeat it enough; art is not the finished work, art is the getting there. This is why good schools believe in art education, in doing art as well as art history. This is why we give children finger paints; it is the process of expressing that we value, along with-or even more than-the finished work, which as Emerson believes observes, passes at once into the mortuary state once completed and detached from its creator, unless, like a seed, it be good for starting the process all over again. “The painter, the sculptor, the composer the epic rhapsodist, the orator, all partake one desire to express themselves symmetrically and abundantly, not and fragmentarily.”

Pixar Story Rules, Good Models and an Emersonian Admonition

There is a lots of buzz about “22 Pixar Points of Storytelling” these days. If one looks deeper, the main points are also articulated by Alexander Mackendrick from CalArts in his collected lecture notes On Film-making. And he credits them back further.
I’ve also being reading Marilynne Robinson’s When I was a Child, I Read Books. In it, she discusses ideas of imitation and quotes Emerson in an address to the Harvard Divinity School on his concern on the state of preaching. (I read storytelling.)

“Let me admonish you first of all: to go alone: to refuse the good models, even those that are scared in the imagination of men, and dare to love God without mediator or veil. Friends enough you shall find who still hold up to your emulation Wesleys and Oberlins, Saints and Prophets. Thank God for these good models, but say, ‘I also am a man.’ Imitation cannot go above its model. The imitator dooms himself to hopeless mediocrity.”

So, we can follow the Pixar rules as they followed Mackendrick’s rules, and on and on, -good models all-but to truly advance, we need to find our own rules and way of preaching.