Robert Fawcett on Drawing

“Bob Fawcett always simplified form in his drawings. He once said, “Economy in drawing is essentially the shorthand which develops in the excitement of the fleeting moment. It is the thing seen subjected to editorial exclusion.” However, he tried to avoid slipping into superficiality: “One’s study can be admired for it’s beautiful line, but if that line is not expressing an understanding of the form itself it remains mildly interesting, but empty of content.””

From Drawing the Nude – The Figure Drawing Techniques of Noted American Illustrator Robert Fawcett” by Howard Munce.

Storyboarding is about economy of drawing. Fawcett would have been a great board artist.

Reference to Fawcett’s drawing methods, HERE

images

A Sample of Sketching Directors Do for Their Boards

sample director sketch

Speilberg Sketch from Raiders

Pixar Story Rules, Good Models and an Emersonian Admonition

There is a lots of buzz about “22 Pixar Points of Storytelling” these days. If one looks deeper, the main points are also articulated by Alexander Mackendrick from CalArts in his collected lecture notes On Film-making. And he credits them back further.
I’ve also being reading Marilynne Robinson’s When I was a Child, I Read Books. In it, she discusses ideas of imitation and quotes Emerson in an address to the Harvard Divinity School on his concern on the state of preaching. (I read storytelling.)

“Let me admonish you first of all: to go alone: to refuse the good models, even those that are scared in the imagination of men, and dare to love God without mediator or veil. Friends enough you shall find who still hold up to your emulation Wesleys and Oberlins, Saints and Prophets. Thank God for these good models, but say, ‘I also am a man.’ Imitation cannot go above its model. The imitator dooms himself to hopeless mediocrity.”

So, we can follow the Pixar rules as they followed Mackendrick’s rules, and on and on, -good models all-but to truly advance, we need to find our own rules and way of preaching.